Iconic photographer Walter Rosenblum on Haiti

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The clip focuses on photographer Walter Rosenblum’s sabbatical to Haiti from 1958-59, in which he photographed many aspects of the Haitian culture.

By Anthony Martinez Beven

“Why did I go to Haiti? I went to Haiti, because I heard a lot about it,” iconic American photographer Walter Rosenblum (1919-2006) says in this video clip, from a documentary on his life and career, shared at the courtesy of his family.

The clip focuses on Rosenblum’s sabbatical to Haiti from 1958-59, in which he photographed many aspects of the Haitian culture, including its people, religion and socioeconomic problems – many of which still exist today.

“It was the finest island that France owned as a colony,” Rosenblum shared. “I had a love affair with the Haitian people that still goes on.”

In the clip, Rosenblum gives his take on the island country, and native Haitians, such as school teacher Josette Lemoine, give their view of him.

“He came as a human being looking at other human beings, and that’s what makes his photographs special,” Lemoine said. “Nobody has ever made photographs of Haitian people as Walter did, never. »

Rosenblum photographed the World War II D-Day landing at Normandy in 1944, among other career highlights. His photography is on display in museums around the world.